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Andrew Zimmern Warns Against Beer Snobbery

Pre-sobriety, Andrew Zimmern was a beer-enjoying man, and, although he no longer imbibes today, he still doesn’t want to see the downfall of his once-beloved beverage. But the Bizarre Foods host predicted that, with its increasing popularity, beer may go the way of wines, cool bands, and cupcakes: mainstream trendy death.

“I used to drink a lot of beer,” Andrew told The Daily Meal. “I like it. I like it very dark and very strong.”

However, he fears for its safety in a dissection, deconstruction, and analytically-obsessed foodie nation.

“It’s nice to see the beer thing come back. But the problem is,” he warns, “I’m afraid that the ‘popularatti’ — that’s a great word to coin — are going to co-opt the beer movement…and then people are going to go ‘Oh, it’s smoky with a raisin finish.’”

First of all, raisin finished beer — no. Second of all, oh dear god, what will become of us all when we’re too damned intimidated by beer flavor notes when we’re met with the menu that we just shut down and order the second cheapest thing on the list? (Because, yes, that’s what we do with wines.)

Let that be a lesson, beer lovers. It’s great to have a hobby, but don’t get too snobby or you’ll ruin it for all of us.

[Daily Meal]

2 thoughts on “Andrew Zimmern Warns Against Beer Snobbery

  1. For a guy who eats animal testes, I’d think he’d love to have a brew that finishes with raisin fruitiness to cleanse his palate. However, he doesn’t imbibe anymore, he is missing out on two delicious raisin beers (Raison D’Etre from Dogfish Head and Oatmeal Raisin Cookie from Cigar City), ones he shouldn’t criticize until he tries.

  2. Interesting concern, however I do not see beer (for the most part, yes there are some very pricy beers) becoming so expensive that ordering the second cheapest thing will become a common practice. Furthermore, the amount of information thrown out there from bloggers like myself, is astounding and therefore it is not that hard to find relevant information on any beer. As restaurants become more beer centered, I think the descriptions will also become more sophisticated. I also think the difference between many beer styles say an IPA and a stout are more noticeable than the difference between a Pinot Grigio and a Sauvignon Blanc. Geographical differences due come into play with beer styles as well, for instance English IPA vs American IPA but I still think those geographic distinctions are easier to differentiate (and often labeled or named more clearly, for instance Burton Bridge Imperial Pale Ale, is clearly not going to be a West Coast hop bomb) general taste profiles than say a Pinot Noir from Sonoma or a Pinot Noir from the Côte d’Or region.

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